Lessons from the Development of Urban Clusters in France
Time:2019-01-25

Why has Vienna become the most livable city in the world?

Vienna, Austria's capital, recently beat 229 other cities to become the world's most livable city in Mercer Consulting's survey. Its excellent geographical location and convenient living facilities have formed a huge attraction for business people. Although it has become a tourist attraction with hundreds of years of castles and works of art, business travelers are also everywhere. "In my opinion, Vienna...


Vienna, Austria's capital, recently beat 229 other cities to become the world's most livable city in Mercer Consulting's survey. Its excellent geographical location and convenient living facilities have formed a huge attraction for business people. Although it has become a tourist attraction with hundreds of years of castles and works of art, business travelers are also everywhere.

"In my opinion, Vienna is the most beautiful city in Europe." Magnus Beyer, an engineer at Imperial College London, said he recently traveled to Vienna for the first time to attend the European Union of Geosciences conference there in April. Jean-Paul Dantil, general manager of the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Vienna, said that although the city is famous for its classical charm, its beauty shocked many travelers.

"When they saw the city, they were overwhelmed by its beauty. The roads here are suitable for walking, and the public transport here is very convenient. Although it is the capital, the traffic situation is not bad, which is surprising. Dantill said.

He said that about half of the guests at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel are business travelers, many of whom are diplomats, senior government officials and consultants who often shake hands with dignitaries at various international conferences. For example, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has held an international conference in Vienna since 1965.

As one of the four major United Nations offices, Vienna has also gathered important organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency. In total, the United Nations employs about 4,400 staff from 120 countries.

With a population of 1.8 million, Vienna is the second largest German-speaking city in the world. Ursula Kainz, a Vienna Business Agency specializing in advising companies at home and abroad, said that with 200,000 college students there, the city has added youthful vitality and multiculturalism, and extended to catering habits and nightlife.

"If you had been here 10 years ago, you would not recognize it now - there are many restaurants and bars, and creative industries, and they are so diverse and open that they are more colorful than before." Kanz said.

Vienna used to be the easternmost outpost of Central Europe, but after the collapse of the Soviet Union, it became the center of the whole European continent through which many enterprises expanded to the newly opened markets of Eastern Europe.

In addition, the eastward expansion of the European Union has made Vienna a a two-way business and investment channel.

More than 200 multinational corporations have established headquarters in Vienna, and more and more multinational corporations have set up offices in Vienna, Cantz said. High quality of life, abundant universities, a stable economy and geographical location adjacent to Eastern Europe all add to Vienna's appeal.

Cultural characteristics

Austrians often act too formally and use titles and honorifics when they speak. For example, even a person with a bachelor's degree will be called Magister, and regardless of whether he graduates from medical science or not, anyone with a doctor's degree will be collectively called "doctor".

Unless they are close business partners, they should never meet with a single word of "hello". Instead, they all say "Grusez Gott", literally translated as "Greeting God". When shaking hands with business partners in Catholic countries, they often use such greetings.

But Austrians are more relaxed in many cases than in northern Germany. It's no big deal to be five or ten minutes late in Vienna.

Viennese people are proud of their customs and habits. They invite their business partners to taste traditional cuisine, which usually includes a beer or a glass of Gr NER Veltliner white wine for lunch.

After visiting the Grand Opera House, business partners usually take you to a roadside stall specializing in sausages.

"This is a high-end fast food, unlike McDonald's, business travelers can also go to taste it. My advice is: don't use knives and forks." Cantz explained with a laugh that the cut sausages would be wrapped in paper and dipped in chili sauce, tomato sauce and mustard, which could be eaten directly by hand.

traffic

Through 60 airlines, 180 direct flights to Vienna are provided. The busiest routes come from Frankfurt, Zurich and London. Last year, the newly renovated Vienna Airport had a passenger throughput of about 23 million. The city's airport train CAT takes only 16 minutes to reach downtown Vienna, with a fare of 11 euros ($12.25) and no stops in the middle.

The three-day bus fare is 16.50 euros ($18.35), which covers metro, light rail and bus. People with longer accommodation can choose other tickets and reduce the daily transportation cost to less than 1 euro ($1.1).

Overall, Vienna's disappearance